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Malware Removal Instructions
From network security to phishing and malicious software. Whatever problem you have, we're here to help you solve it!...

by Admin, Mountain View (geolocate), published: Tue 31 Mar 2015 08:40:00 PM CEST.

Favicon Remove nextbestgame.org pop-up on startup (Virus Removal Guide)
31 Mar 2015, 8:40 pm
Most of us have been there: and by 'there' we mean discovered a nextbestgame.org pop-up window on our PC that we're confident that we didn't install ourselves. But where did this malware come from, and is it any better than the one you already had installed – or can it actually do you harm?

Apart from the question of how did it get onto your computer, chances are after experiencing its functionality – or lack of – chances are that you would like to uninstall it too. We'll tell you why.

How did the nextbestgame.org end up on my PC?

It can be a real conundrum but if you think back to the last installation, upgrade or download you performed on your computer, chances are that it was only very shortly before you remember first seeing the annoying pop-up. And that's because nextbestgame.org pop-up windows that show up on startup of this nature are something called a Potentially Unwanted Program (or a PUP for short). And PUPs install themselves by piggy backing on other programs.

That means that if you've just downloaded some software that lets you watch video clips online, or upgraded your instant messenger app to the latest version you may have also inadvertently downloaded this new potentially unwanted program that modifies Windows registry so that these annoying pop-up windows show up every time you turn on your computer. It could be nextbestgame.org, zebragamers.org or tainagame.org. They change quite often but seeing one of these usually means that your computer is infected with a PUP and very likely some other malware. So, it's not just annoying it indicates a serious threat.

The whole Windows registry modification looks like this:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run then it should be "CMD" running cmd.exe /c start http://nextbestgame.org & & exit.

Are nextbestgame.org pop-ups harmful?

It can be a gray area because Potentially Unwanted Programs are not technically malware. As the title suggests, they are only 'potentially unwanted'. However, that doesn't mean you have to simply accept this intrusion of your privacy and keep the nextbestgame.org pop-up window.

Potentially Unwanted Programs can also display some unpleasant behavior. PUPs are renowned for being loaded with adware – which means that you may also now be seeing vast numbers of annoying pop up or pop under adverts. A lot of Potentially Unwanted Programs also cause your PC to run slowly and your internet to keep crashing. In addition to this some unwanted programs have been designed to redirect any web searches you make to websites that the PUP's developer wants you to visit, in this case it's nextbestgame.org. You probably don't need us to go into any great detail about how irritating, time consuming and downright invasive that is.

How do you avoid being ambushed by nextbestgame.org pop-ups on startup?

Most of the time you actually have a say in whether or not you download it. We say 'most of the time' because occasionally Potentially Unwanted Programs are packed with other programs. Others may infect you when you visit a compromised website – something known as a drive by installation. You probably got it after installing some freeware and downloading suspicious file.

However because the majority of PUPs come bundled with other programs, and because they are technically not malware, they will be mentioned in the License Agreement that you see when installing or downloading something. You may have to scan the small print – but you will find that it's up to you whether you install that toolbar.

To stop annoying pop-ups on your computer, you can use Autoruns for Windows or open up Windows registry editor, search for nextbestgame.org, zebragamers.org or tainagame.org and delete all entries you find. You can also remove this error message by removing the start-up entry in the Windows Task Scheduler. I recommend using Autoruns. Once the problem is fixed, scan your computer with anti-malware software. Why? Because very often this adware comes bundled with PUPs and even spyware. There might be malware on your computer that you didn't notice yet. If you have any questions, please leave a comment down below. Good luck and be safe online!

Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com


Nextbestgame.org Pop-up Removal Guide:

1. First of all, download recommended anti-malware software and run a full system scan. It will detect and remove this infection from your computer. You may then follow the manual removal instructions below to remove the leftover traces of this malware. Hopefully you won't have to do that.





2. Download Autoruns for Windows and save it to your Desktop.

3. Launch autoruns.exe program (Vista/Windows 7/8 users right-click and select Run As Administrator).



4. In the top menu, click Options > Filter Options.



5. Uncheck Hide Microsft entries and click Rescan.



6. Open Longon tab. Find HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run in the list. Then right-click CMD and select Delete.



7. Close Autoruns and reboot your computer when done.

8. Scan your computer with anti-malware software.

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    Favicon Ads by MediPlayer Removal Guide
    30 Mar 2015, 7:56 pm
    Many of us have had the unfortunate experience of seeing Ads by MediPlayer and adware programs that we don't recognize. "Did I download this and then suffer complete memory loss?!" we may think to ourselves. The good news is, no you're not going mad. The bad news is you've probably been infected by a Potentially Unwanted Program – or a PUP for short or adware. That leaves the following questions: how on earth did the adware get onto your PC - and how do you get rid of ads by MediPlayer?

    If you think back to when the mystery adverts powered by MediPlayer appeared you may recall that prior to that you did something like updating a version of a legitimate program you have installed, or you downloaded some freeware. So, why does downloading one program also download a potenftially unwanted one or even adware? Just how do these programs install themselves without your knowledge - and what can you do to stop it happening again?

    How is MediPlayer adware installed?

    Adware programs infect you in one of three ways: they're either pre-installed on a new computer, they are packaged with another program or they can occasionally be installed by something known as a 'drive by installation', which is when a compromised website infects you with whatever type of malicious software IT has been infected with. In my case, MediPlayer2.8 was packed with another program that is unfortunately used by many users to download videos from popular streaming websites. Detection ration of this adware isn't great, just 8 out of 57 anti-virus engines currently detect it. Some of the detection names: PUP.Optional.CrossRider, PUA.ScrambleWrapper, PUP/Win32.CrossRider.

    How do you tell if you have adware on your PC?

    If you keep getting ads by MediPlayer then your computer is definitely infected with adware. But the problem is that it can be listed under a different name which makes the removal of this adware somehow complicated. If you're using a computer running on the Windows Operating System (unfortunately Windows based PCs are far more prone to attacks by malware than Apple Macs) then you can easily check whether the program you don't recognize is actually adware or just something you genuinely don't remember installing.

    Here's how to check in Windows:
    1. Go to the Control Panel
    2. Select Programs then Uninstall or Change a Program
    3. All the programs that are installed on your computer are listed here. Information included will be the programs' names, who their publishers are, plus the date of installation
    4. See something that you don't recognize? With a bit of luck you will be able to uninstall it now
    5. While you have this function open you can also click on Installed On – this will then sort all the programs by their installation dates.
    6. Check the date and time that the adware was installed and then the program next to it in the list. A corresponding date and time means it is highly likely that the adware was packaged with this program
    How to avoid downloading MediPlayer in the future

    Unfortunately programs of all degrees of legitimacy can be bundled with adware – whether the publisher or owner of that program knows it or not. This means that when you download programs, you need to read the Terms and Conditions or the License Agreement carefully. Ads by MediPlayer are always mentioned in the small print so if a program is asking you if you would 'also like to download' – think carefully whether you want to risk installing adware too. To remove it from your computer, please follow the steps in the removal guide below. If you have any questions, please leave a comment down below. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    Ads by MediPlayer Removal Guide:


    1. First of all, download anti-malware software and run a full system scan. It will detect and remove this infection from your computer. You may then follow the manual removal instructions below to remove the leftover traces of this malware. Hopefully you won't have to do that.





    2. Remove Ads by MediPlayer related programs from your computer using the Add/Remove Programs control panel (Windows XP) or Uninstall a program control panel (Windows 7 and Windows 8).

    Go to the Start Menu. Select Control PanelAdd/Remove Programs.
    If you are using Windows Vista or Windows 7, select Control PanelUninstall a Program.



    If you are using Windows 8, simply drag your mouse pointer to the right edge of the screen, select Search from the list and search for "control panel".



    Or you can right-click on a bottom left hot corner (formerly known as the Start button) and select Control panel from there.



    3. When the Add/Remove Programs or the Uninstall a Program screen is displayed, scroll through the list of currently installed programs and remove the following:
    • MediPlayer 2.8
    • GoSave
    • deals4me
    • SaveNewaAppz
    • and any other recently installed application


    Simply select each application and click Remove. If you are using Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8, click Uninstall up near the top of that window. When you're done, please close the Control Panel screen.

    Remove Ads by MediPlayer related extensions from Google Chrome:

    1. Click on Chrome menu button. Go to ToolsExtensions.



    2. Click on the trashcan icon to remove MediPlayer 2.8, MediaPlayerV1, Gosave, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    If the removal option is grayed out then read how to remove extensions installed by enterprise policy.




    Remove Ads by MediPlayer related extensions from Mozilla Firefox:

    1. Open Mozilla Firefox. Go to ToolsAdd-ons.



    2. Select Extensions. Click Remove button to remove MediPlayer 2.8, Gosave, MediaPlayerV1, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    Remove Ads by MediPlayer related add-ons from Internet Explorer:

    1. Open Internet Explorer. Go to ToolsManage Add-ons. If you have the latest version, simply click on the Settings button.



    2. Select Toolbars and Extensions. Click Remove/Disable button to remove the browser add-ons listed above.

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    Favicon How to Remove Assist Point Ads Malware (Uninstall Guide)
    28 Mar 2015, 9:12 pm
    Assist Point will display ads on your computer once you have installed or run it on your PC. It is a confidence trickster of the highest order that has been detected as BehavesLike.Win32.Suspicious.fc, Threat.Win.Reputation.IMP and Win32/Virus.Adware.708 by multiple anti-virus engines. It's from the same family as the Positive Finds adware. It will present itself as a legitimate and genuinely useful piece of software that enhances your web browsing experience and allows you to access certain information easier or a file from a trusted sender or source, leading you to fall into its trap. But the truth is that it's designed to spy on you and display "Assist Point Ads" adverts. Pretty much every website you visit will be riddled with adverts which is really annoying. There are adware programs that are merely irritating, but there are a raft of others which can cause serious problems for your computer and data. At the lesser end of the scale, it will hijack your web browser by adding unwanted and unnecessary browser extensions and sending valuable information about your browsing habits to third parties. They will know what websites you visit and what do you usually search for. Not a comforting thought!


    How does adware – or more precisely, the creators of adware – know what sort of adverts have a higher likelihood of you clicking on them and visiting their website? Well, that's where spyware comes in to the equation. Once infected, you will notice that Assist Point Ads are for some reason very targeted based on your web browsing history and interests. Adware and spyware do have certain characteristics in common, namely the ability to monitor which websites you are visiting, and which products or services you are looking at once you are on a particular site. Technically speaking, it is not as harmful or malicious as spyware, but regardless, it is still something that you should avoid where possible.

    While it's virtually impossible to guarantee that your anti-virus program will keep absolutely everything at bay, the good news is there are steps you can take to protect your computer from being infected with Assist Point Ads, or indeed any type of malware. Here are some of the most important ways of protecting your PC. Firstly, to avoid installing Assist Point Ads on your computer, it is useful to know how it gets on to your system in the first place. It is installed when you download another program. It is secretly bundled in with this program and will install itself onto your hard drive at the same time as the main installation. But that's not all, for the adware will also install a type of tracking component as well. And it is this which is able to capture data concerning the sites that you are visiting and the content that you are looking at once you are there. This data is then relayed back to the adware developer who uses the knowledge to display adverts that you are likely to be interested in on your PC's screen.

    As seen above, Assist Point could be considered a type of spyware, thanks to its web monitoring function, but thankfully it doesn't take invasive techniques to a whole new level by recording which keys you type, and some key loggers take screenshots too. If you don't know how to remove the adware from your computer and stop these annoying Assist Point ads, please follow the steps in the removal guide below. If you have any questions, please leave a comment down below. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    Assist Point Ads Removal Guide:


    1. First of all, download anti-malware software and run a full system scan. It will detect and remove this infection from your computer. You may then follow the manual removal instructions below to remove the leftover traces of this malware. Hopefully you won't have to do that.





    2. Remove Assist Point related programs from your computer using the Add/Remove Programs control panel (Windows XP) or Uninstall a program control panel (Windows 7 and Windows 8).

    Go to the Start Menu. Select Control PanelAdd/Remove Programs.
    If you are using Windows Vista or Windows 7, select Control PanelUninstall a Program.



    If you are using Windows 8, simply drag your mouse pointer to the right edge of the screen, select Search from the list and search for "control panel".



    Or you can right-click on a bottom left hot corner (formerly known as the Start button) and select Control panel from there.



    3. When the Add/Remove Programs or the Uninstall a Program screen is displayed, scroll through the list of currently installed programs and remove the following:
    • Assist Point
    • GoSave
    • deals4me
    • SaveNewaAppz
    • and any other recently installed application


    Simply select each application and click Remove. If you are using Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8, click Uninstall up near the top of that window. When you're done, please close the Control Panel screen.

    Remove Assist Point related extensions from Google Chrome:

    1. Click on Chrome menu button. Go to ToolsExtensions.



    2. Click on the trashcan icon to remove Assist Point, MediaPlayerV1, Gosave, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    If the removal option is grayed out then read how to remove extensions installed by enterprise policy.




    Remove Assist Point related extensions from Mozilla Firefox:

    1. Open Mozilla Firefox. Go to ToolsAdd-ons.



    2. Select Extensions. Click Remove button to remove Assist Point, Gosave, MediaPlayerV1, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    Remove Assist Point related add-ons from Internet Explorer:

    1. Open Internet Explorer. Go to ToolsManage Add-ons. If you have the latest version, simply click on the Settings button.



    2. Select Toolbars and Extensions. Click Remove/Disable button to remove the browser add-ons listed above.

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    Favicon Ads by Provider Removal Guide
    27 Mar 2015, 8:25 pm
    Ads by Provider started popping up on all of your web browsers? Here we're going to take a closer look at adware that displays these adverts and learn how to remove them. We are all increasingly spending more time than ever before online, that's partly in thanks to the rapid rise of the laptops and computers. But as well as making working, playing and living ever more convenient, the problem with being almost constantly connected is that it vastly increases our chances of being infected by malicious software, or malware. And one particularly unpleasant type of malware that it is well worth knowing more about in order to protect your data and operating system is the adware.

    Here's an example of a web page riddled with adverts with the tag "Ad by Provider" at the bottom of the advert. The adware underlines certain words on a web page you view and provides relevant information to you. However, I noticed that it can display random ads as well, so it's not that well coded at some other adware programs out there.


    You may have heard "Ads by Provider" called viruses although this is not technically true. The one thing that adware programs do have slightly in their favor is that they don't replicate themselves – which true computer viruses do. Regardless, self replication or not, they are still not something that you want on your computer and you should know what they are and how to protect yourself from them if you want to stay as secure as possible when you're online. And who doesn't want that!

    How do ads by Provider infect your computer?

    The majority of adware programs infiltrate your computer's operating system by piggy backing onto another program, piece of software or file. Whether the owners of that software or file realize that they have the adware attached to their product is up for debate: some do, while others are completely in the dark. That's the way this adware programs operate. It's because their programmers know that chances are, you wouldn't download and install adware through choice, so they have to ensure that they find their way on to your PC by rather more surreptitious methods.

    You already have everything you could possibly need, so why do you need Ads by Provider foisted upon you? Particularly when you consider that it's not as functional as your existing one.

    How to prevent Ads by Provider

    Asides from the fact that Ads by Provider are somewhat presumptuous, they have some annoying side effects. Such as slowing your computer's operating system down, causing your Internet to crash, redirecting you to websites you don't want to visit.

    So, whether you have or haven't been the victim of adware, you no doubt want to learn how to prevent being targeted by one. Here are a few simple tips to help you ensure your computer is adware free zone.
    • Do not download new media players to view videos – no matter what they tell you. These are often loaded with adware and worse - malware.
    • Make sure all your PC's software and security patches are bang up to date. It's usually an automatic process but it's still in your best interests to check.
    • Only ever download files and software from trustworthy websites and don't resort to using third party sites if possible for software downloads.
    How to remove Ads by Provider

    There is actually a fairly obvious answer to this: in fact the paragraph above may have given you a clue. Asides from installing a decent anti-malware program, which is an excellent idea, you should also be careful when downloading from the Internet. This means reading the License Agreement that is displayed when you download something. The adware will be mentioned, so ensure you read it carefully – that will give you a fighting chance of avoiding it.

    If you have any questions, please leave a comment down below. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    Ads by Provider Removal Guide:


    1. First of all, download anti-malware software and run a full system scan. It will detect and remove this infection from your computer. You may then follow the manual removal instructions below to remove the leftover traces of this malware. Hopefully you won't have to do that.





    2. Remove Ads by Provider related programs from your computer using the Add/Remove Programs control panel (Windows XP) or Uninstall a program control panel (Windows 7 and Windows 8).

    Go to the Start Menu. Select Control PanelAdd/Remove Programs.
    If you are using Windows Vista or Windows 7, select Control PanelUninstall a Program.



    If you are using Windows 8, simply drag your mouse pointer to the right edge of the screen, select Search from the list and search for "control panel".



    Or you can right-click on a bottom left hot corner (formerly known as the Start button) and select Control panel from there.



    3. When the Add/Remove Programs or the Uninstall a Program screen is displayed, scroll through the list of currently installed programs and remove the following:
    • Provider
    • GoSave
    • deals4me
    • SaveNewaAppz
    • and any other recently installed application


    Simply select each application and click Remove. If you are using Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8, click Uninstall up near the top of that window. When you're done, please close the Control Panel screen.

    Remove Ads by Provider related extensions from Google Chrome:

    1. Click on Chrome menu button. Go to ToolsExtensions.



    2. Click on the trashcan icon to remove Provider, MediaPlayerV1, Gosave, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    If the removal option is grayed out then read how to remove extensions installed by enterprise policy.




    Remove Ads by Provider related extensions from Mozilla Firefox:

    1. Open Mozilla Firefox. Go to ToolsAdd-ons.



    2. Select Extensions. Click Remove button to remove Provider, Gosave, MediaPlayerV1, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    Remove Ads by Provider related add-ons from Internet Explorer:

    1. Open Internet Explorer. Go to ToolsManage Add-ons. If you have the latest version, simply click on the Settings button.



    2. Select Toolbars and Extensions. Click Remove/Disable button to remove the browser add-ons listed above.

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    Favicon Remove Antivirus PRO 2015 Scareware (Uninstall Guide)
    26 Mar 2015, 8:20 pm
    Antivirus PRO 2015 is a rogue security program (scareware) that disguises itself as real security software, displaying pop-up windows claiming you potentially have a virus on your machine and should run it as quickly as possible to help stop it in its tracks. Of course, the very mention of the words 'computer virus' or 'malware' is enough to send most of us into a panic – especially as these days more and more of our lives are stored on our computers. Therefore it is easy to fall into the rogue security software trap. We believe we have a virus on our PC (after all, why would 'security software' lie about that?), we run the scan – and of course, yes the scan's results are that we are infested up to the eyeballs – and then naturally we are asked to purchase and install the bogus security software.

    Some of the supposed infections are: Win32/Wadnock, Password.WIn32.OnlineGameSxa, Ld Pinch V. All these detection names are also displayed in pop-up windows and sometimes on webpage wen displaying fake warnings about dangerous websites, even though they are not dangerous at all, msn.com for instance. If you can't remove Antivirus PRO 2015 from your computer and need help, please follow the steps in the removal guide below.


    And it's not just our bank accounts that are under attack from Antivirus PRO 2015 rogue security software, for the program poses a number of other risks. As with other forms of malware, rogue security software can also leave your computer vulnerable to some serious security breaches.
    • You are led to believe that you have a reputable and proactive security program installed on your computer. You don't. This in turn leads you to believe that you are protected against malware threats. You aren't. Antivirus PRO 2015 may even tell you it has detected viruses or issues on your computer and has successfully removed them, just to look more authentic.
    • Because it is the interests of the software developer for you to keep their program installed on your machine, some rogue security software stops you from visiting the websites belonging to legitimate security software sellers so that, even if you are aware that you have a rogue program on your PC, you are not able to uninstall it without going to a whole lot of trouble.
    • Not only are you paying for a product that is essentially useless – and possibly dangerous – but you are also handing over your payment details to someone who makes their living from fraud. I don't think we even need to expand on that issue!
    • Really nasty variants of this rogue security software program take their activities to the next level, causing issues with your genuine security software, or even going so far as to deactivate it completely.
    So next time you see a pop-up window telling you that you have X amount of issues on your PC, do yourself a favor and stop and consider the consequences before you click to run a scan. Please note that Antivirus PRO 2015 blocks pretty much every other program on your computer. Needless to say it blocks legitimate malware removal tools too. For this reason, you will probably have to restart your computer in Safe Mode with Networking and download legitimate anti-malware program from there. If you have any questions, please leave a comment down below. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    Antivirus PRO 2015 Removal in Safe Mode with Networking:


    1. Reboot your computer is "Safe Mode with Networking". As the computer is booting tap the "F8 key" continuously which should bring up the "Windows Advanced Options Menu" as shown below. Use your arrow keys to move to "Safe Mode with Networking" and press Enter key.


    NOTE: Login as the same user you were previously logged in with in the normal Windows mode.

    2. Download recommended anti-malware software (direct download) and run a full system scan to remove this malware from your computer.





    NOTE: if you can't run anti-malware software, rename the installer to iexplore.exe and try again.

    Associated Antivirus PRO 2015 files and registry values:

    Files:
    • %Documents%\avicap32v2.exe
    • %UserProfile%\AppData\LocalLow\[SET OF RANDOM CHARACTERS].png
    • %UserProfile%\AppData\LocalLow\[SET OF RANDOM CHARACTERS].dat
    Registry values:
    • HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\avicap32v2

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    Favicon 1-844-332-7029 Critical System Alert Scam Pop-Up Removal Guide
    24 Mar 2015, 8:48 pm
    If your web browser redirects you to dodgy websites that try to get you to call 1-844-332-7029 to remove viruses then your computer is infected with adware and possibly some other malware. I've found a few websites that promote this tech support scam: system-online-error.com and security-support.co. It would be a good idea to block both websites because they display fake pop-up windows claiming that your computer is infected with malware. Notice how scammers use Microsoft Security Essentials logo and your IP address which can be easily found using a JavaScript code to make the warning look legitimate. It even pretends to scan your computer but what it really does is simply display a fake web page with fake virus detection. Just like any other tech support scam, it says that you should call a number, in this case 1-844-332-7029, to get your computer fixed. If you don't know already, scammers won't fix your computer and will install bogus programs including remote access tools. Needles to say, it's might end up pretty bad if you decide to call and then follow their directions. Here's how the fake pop-up warning reads:

    System has found multiple viruses that pose a serious threat:
    Trojan.FakeAV-Download
    Adware.Win32.Look2me.ab
    Adware.Hotbar
    Trojan-PSW.Win32.LdPinch.abm
    Your personal and financial information might be at risk call 1-844-332-7029 for security check.


    Some of the threats listed in this pop-up warning do exist but others were made up to scare you. They are clearly not for Microsoft and this pop-up is not from Microsoft Security Essentials. Your IP address, date and other information can be easily pulled using a simple web script in case you wonder how they know such information. The statement that Security Essentials has detected that security lever of your computer is critically low is also false. As a matter of fact, you may not have it installed on your computer.

    Spyware and adware are often mentioned in the same breath and this is because a lot of adware programs exhibit some seriously spyware type behavior. Adware comes with a component which monitors your Internet usage and then relays the information gathered back to the programmer. This gives them insight into which websites you have visited and which products or services you looked at when you were on those sites. Using this data they can then choose which adverts you see based on your preferences.

    Before you get too alarmed, just because you can see 1-844-332-7029 pop-up warnings on your screen it doesn't necessarily mean that you are being monitored as not all adware has a tracking component – although much of it does – the problem is, how do you know?

    Despite this unpleasant behavior using adware is not actually against the law, unless of course it displays fake virus warnings. But I think we can probably all agree that being spied upon whenever we are connected to the Internet is a real invasion of our online privacy regardless. The other additional problem that this spying activity causes is that the constant monitoring and relaying of data also slows your computer and your Internet connection right down – not great, especially considering you're the victim here!

    If you have questions, leave a comment down below. I will be more than happy to help you. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com


    1-844-332-7029 Pop-up Warning Removal Guide:

    1. First of all, download anti-malware software and run a full system scan. It will detect and remove this infection from your computer. You may then follow the manual removal instructions below to remove the leftover traces of this malware. Hopefully you won't have to do that.





    2. Remove 1-844-332-7029 virus pop-up related programs from your computer using the Add/Remove Programs control panel (Windows XP) or Uninstall a program control panel (Windows 7 and Windows 8).

    Go to the Start Menu. Select Control PanelAdd/Remove Programs.
    If you are using Windows Vista or Windows 7, select Control PanelUninstall a Program.



    If you are using Windows 8, simply drag your mouse pointer to the right edge of the screen, select Search from the list and search for "control panel".



    Or you can right-click on a bottom left hot corner (formerly known as the Start button) and select Control panel from there.



    3. When the Add/Remove Programs or the Uninstall a Program screen is displayed, scroll through the list of currently installed programs and remove the following:
    • Safe Web
    • LyricsSay-1
    • Websteroids
    • BlocckkTheAds
    • HD-Plus 3.5
    • and any other recently installed application


    Simply select each application and click Remove. If you are using Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8, click Uninstall up near the top of that window. When you're done, please close the Control Panel screen.


    Remove 1-844-332-7029 pop-ups from Google Chrome:

    1. Click on Chrome menu button. Go to ToolsExtensions.



    2. Click on the trashcan icon to remove Safe Web, LyricsSay-1, Websteroids, Quiknowledge, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.



    If the removal option is grayed out then read how to remove extensions installed by enterprise policy.




    Remove 1-844-332-7029 pop-ups from Google Chrome:

    1. Open Mozilla Firefox. Go to ToolsAdd-ons.



    2. Select Extensions. Click Remove button to remove Safe Web, LyricsSay-1, Websteroids, Quiknowledge, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.




    Remove 1-844-332-7029 pop-ups from Internet Explorer:

    1. Open Internet Explorer. Go to ToolsManage Add-ons. If you have the latest version, simply click on the Settings button.



    2. Select Toolbars and Extensions. Click Remove/Disable button to remove the browser add-ons listed above.

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    Favicon How to Remove Russian Ads (Uninstall Guide)
    24 Mar 2015, 7:45 pm
    Russian ads started popping up on all of your web browsers? There is a good chance that your computer is infected with adware and malicious web browser extensions. You may well have heard of adware, and you know it is something you want to avoid, but do you know how to prevent it from installing itself on your PC? I believe that to be forewarned is to be forearmed which is why we encourage all computer users to learn as much about the various forms of adware and malware that are out there as they can.

    I started seeing Russian ads after installing freeware which later installed a malicious browser extension called Image Hover Zoom. Most of the ads were adult and some advertised 'earn money fast' scams. I'm still not sure why adware's developer decided to infect computers in countries where users do not speak Russian and normally don't see that kind of ads. Needles to say, everyone will immediately realize that something isn't right. Maybe they were testing something or maybe it was a bug in code or severs. One way or another, it turned out well for most users as they could notice that their computers were infected.


    The adware also installs a component on your computer which tracks your online browsing habits – meaning it monitors which websites you are looking at. This then allows the adware's developer to show you adverts that are more akin to your interests, or what they perceive to be your interests. The main issue is that this component, because it is working hard to track what you're doing and then relay this data back to the developer, is taking up valuable resources on your operating system, subsequently slowing your CPU down, and your Internet connection too – which it is using to transit the data it has collected about you. But obviously, for some reason their tracking component failed at the time I was testing this adware and seeing lots of Russian ads on my web browser.

    What else does this adware do to a PC?

    Such adware programs exhibit some truly disturbing behavior and they are definitely something which you should take pains to prevent from infecting you. More of that shortly but first here are just some of the problems adware and Russian ads can cause you.
    • Your computer takes longer to boot up and is running a lot more slowly than normal
    • Your default settings have changed and refuse to revert back to normal no matter how many times you try
    • Programs won't open or open and then crash
    • Your desktop may have changed and new icons have appeared
    • Websites may take far longer to load
    • You might be seeing numerous Russian pop up ads, in this case 
    • A new mystery tool bar has suddenly appeared
    Defending yourself against Russian ads and pop-ups

    We strongly suggest implementing one, if not all, of the following measures to protect yourself against the horrors of adware.
    • Install a reputable anti-malware program and keep it bang up to date
    • Install a firewall
    • Ensure all programs and applications on devices are also fully up to date
    • Try and steer clear of websites of a dubious nature. Gaming and adult websites are often hotspots for adware (and other malware)
    • Don't open attachments or click on links in emails and instant messages if you don't recognize the sender
    • And if you DO trust the sender, still exercise caution as they could have been hacked or the email could be a spoof
    The silver lining of this malicious cloud is that there are a number of actions you can take to lower your chances of getting fooled by adware. Most importantly is of course, having a well-known, reputable, and up to date, anti-malware program running on your PC. Be careful though as some security software is fooled by adware and malicious browser extensions so make sure you go for the best one you can afford. To remove Russian ads, please follow the steps in the removal guide below.

    If you have any questions, please leave a comment down below. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    Russian Ads Removal Guide:


    1. First of all, download anti-malware software and run a full system scan. It will detect and remove this infection from your computer. You may then follow the manual removal instructions below to remove the leftover traces of this malware. Hopefully you won't have to do that.





    2. Remove Russian Ads related programs from your computer using the Add/Remove Programs control panel (Windows XP) or Uninstall a program control panel (Windows 7 and Windows 8).

    Go to the Start Menu. Select Control PanelAdd/Remove Programs.
    If you are using Windows Vista or Windows 7, select Control PanelUninstall a Program.



    If you are using Windows 8, simply drag your mouse pointer to the right edge of the screen, select Search from the list and search for "control panel".



    Or you can right-click on a bottom left hot corner (formerly known as the Start button) and select Control panel from there.



    3. When the Add/Remove Programs or the Uninstall a Program screen is displayed, scroll through the list of currently installed programs and remove the following:
    • Image Hover Zoom
    • GoSave
    • deals4me
    • SaveNewaAppz
    • and any other recently installed application


    Simply select each application and click Remove. If you are using Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8, click Uninstall up near the top of that window. When you're done, please close the Control Panel screen.

    Remove Russian Ads related extensions from Google Chrome:

    1. Click on Chrome menu button. Go to ToolsExtensions.



    2. Click on the trashcan icon to remove Image Hover Zoom, MediaPlayerV1, Gosave, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    If the removal option is grayed out then read how to remove extensions installed by enterprise policy.




    Remove Russian Ads related extensions from Mozilla Firefox:

    1. Open Mozilla Firefox. Go to ToolsAdd-ons.



    2. Select Extensions. Click Remove button to remove Image Hover Zoom, Gosave, MediaPlayerV1, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    Remove Russian Ads related add-ons from Internet Explorer:

    1. Open Internet Explorer. Go to ToolsManage Add-ons. If you have the latest version, simply click on the Settings button.



    2. Select Toolbars and Extensions. Click Remove/Disable button to remove the browser add-ons listed above.

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    Favicon How to Remove Express Find Ads Malware (Uninstall Guide)
    21 Mar 2015, 7:41 pm
    Being a victim of Express Find Ads, or Express Find adware as it's more commonly called, can be one of the most downright frustrating things that can happen to a computer user. Let's face it, we all use the Internet in varying degrees and the longer we spend online, the more we are putting ourselves at risk of being infected with a type of malicious software, or malware. So what is an innocent Internet user to do if we want to stay safe while we're shopping, working, surfing or playing online? For a start, it helps massively to know what we need to look out for. And that is why we're going to take a closer look at adware today.

    What is Express Find?

    How do you know if you've encountered Express Find and is it really something that you should be concerned about? At its simplest, it is adware that comes in the format of software. This software is downloaded onto your computer and will then show you adverts of the developer's choosing.


    It is everywhere and comes in varying degrees of annoyingness! From simple Express Find ads on a website to pop-up adverts that refuse to go away no matter how many times you click on them to close them, adware can be virtually impossible to avoid.


    Most variants of this adware is downloaded onto your computer when you install, open or download another program, an app or a file. The adware will be surreptitiously bundled with the download and will be automatically installed when you run the other program.

    What does it do – apart from showing you adverts?

    So why all the fuss about Express Find if it is simply a form of online marketing – albeit it a rather irritating one? The problem is that it installs a component on your computer which tracks your online browsing habits – meaning it monitors which websites you are looking at. This then allows the adware's developer to show you adverts that are more akin to your interests, or what they perceive to be your interests. The main issue is that this component, because it is working hard to track what you're doing and then relay this data back to the developer, is taking up valuable resources on your operating system, subsequently slowing your CPU down, and your Internet connection too – which it is using to transit the data it has collected about you.

    It can also hijack your web browser, then redirecting you to websites that the developer wants you to visit instead of the search terms or URL you have typed in. Clearly that is something that would try the patience of a saint!

    How do you stop Express Find from installing itself on your computer?

    Crucially, you need to make sure you always read the End User Licensing Agreement (EULA) properly before you install or download anything. And that includes software, applications, files, tools – everything! In particular, you need to be alert when downloading free software as this is the biggest culprit for being bundled with adware. EULAs do actually tell you what is being installed – even if it is adware – so it really does make sense to read them properly and make sure you know exactly what you're downloading.

    To remove Express Find and stop annoying ads, please follow the steps in the removal guide below.

    If you have any questions, please leave a comment down below. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    Express Find Ads Removal Guide:


    1. First of all, download anti-malware software and run a full system scan. It will detect and remove this infection from your computer. You may then follow the manual removal instructions below to remove the leftover traces of this malware. Hopefully you won't have to do that.





    2. Remove Express Find related programs from your computer using the Add/Remove Programs control panel (Windows XP) or Uninstall a program control panel (Windows 7 and Windows 8).

    Go to the Start Menu. Select Control PanelAdd/Remove Programs.
    If you are using Windows Vista or Windows 7, select Control PanelUninstall a Program.



    If you are using Windows 8, simply drag your mouse pointer to the right edge of the screen, select Search from the list and search for "control panel".



    Or you can right-click on a bottom left hot corner (formerly known as the Start button) and select Control panel from there.



    3. When the Add/Remove Programs or the Uninstall a Program screen is displayed, scroll through the list of currently installed programs and remove the following:
    • Express Find
    • GoSave
    • deals4me
    • SaveNewaAppz
    • and any other recently installed application


    Simply select each application and click Remove. If you are using Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8, click Uninstall up near the top of that window. When you're done, please close the Control Panel screen.

    Remove Express Find related extensions from Google Chrome:

    1. Click on Chrome menu button. Go to ToolsExtensions.



    2. Click on the trashcan icon to remove Express Find, MediaPlayerV1, Gosave, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    If the removal option is grayed out then read how to remove extensions installed by enterprise policy.




    Remove Express Find related extensions from Mozilla Firefox:

    1. Open Mozilla Firefox. Go to ToolsAdd-ons.



    2. Select Extensions. Click Remove button to remove Express Find, Gosave, MediaPlayerV1, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    Remove Express Find related add-ons from Internet Explorer:

    1. Open Internet Explorer. Go to ToolsManage Add-ons. If you have the latest version, simply click on the Settings button.



    2. Select Toolbars and Extensions. Click Remove/Disable button to remove the browser add-ons listed above.

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    Favicon Remove "Adobe Flash Player is out of date" pop up (Uninstall Guide)
    20 Mar 2015, 9:39 pm
    "Adobe Flash Player is out-of-date" is a fake pop-up being displayed by adware on popular web services like Steam and also web browsers. Usually, it shows up when you open a new tab or start a program. Please note that it's not a legitimate Flash Player update pop-up. If in doubt, you can always verify your version of Flash Player with the Adobe site. Have you ever wondered what exactly adware is? Adware, or advertising supported software to give it its full name, is not as harmful as some types of malicious software but about the best thing you can say about it is that usually you can ignore it, while at the other end of the scale, adware can be something that will drive you absolutely nuts thanks to its proliferation of "Adobe Flash Player is out-of-date" pop-up windows. And of course, there is the added fact that whether you choose to ignore it or not, adware is still something that is monitoring everything you do when you're connected to the Internet. The fake pop-up reads:
    The version of this plug-in on your computer does not include the latest security updates and is blocked. To continue using "Adobe Flash Player", download and update from Adobe. 

    The problem is that the given link won't redirect you to Adobe's official update website nor it will start a download from Adobe servers. What you will get is a malicious file that will install more adware on your computer.

    So what does being infected with "Adobe Flash Player is out of date" pop-up and adware mean for you? Let's take a look at what adware actually is. We all see advertising everywhere we go; from television adverts to magazine ads and from billboards to adverts on the side of buses, we are constantly being marketed to. And the Internet is no different. Adware is a means for software developers who give away apps or programs, or who share files for free, to generate an income. It costs money to develop an app and selling advertising online is a potential way for a programmer to recoup some of their losses. But how do you get adware on your computer in the first place? It is usually bundled with the original program, file or app that you have downloaded.

    So while adware that displays Adobe Flash Player is out of date pop-ups and similar adverts might be a good source of income for the programmer, what effect can it have on end users like me and you? As mentioned, in its most innocuous form, adware is nothing more than something which you can usually ignore, however if you've been infected by a nasty strain of it, it can have a detrimental knock on effect on the operation of your computer. And that's because adware installs a component on your PC that is tracking your browsing habits.

    This component has been designed to monitor what websites you're visiting, collect that data and send it back to the programmer. This enables them to then show you adverts that have been tailored to match your interests – i.e. the goods or services that you have recently been looking at online. Clearly by showing you ads that you are more interested in increases the chances of you clicking on the advert and visiting, and of course potentially buying something. Even if you don't purchase anything, clicked-on adverts are still generating traffic to a site, which is in its own way beneficial to the website's owner. The downside for you is that this component slows down your CPU, your Internet connection and can leave your PC vulnerable to security breaches.

    So how do you stop adware from installing itself on your computer and displaying "Adobe Flash Player is out of date" pop-up windows? The singularly most important thing you can do (aside from installing a good anti-malware – which we are going to assume you already have!) is to make sure you read End User License Agreements carefully. They will tell you what exactly you are installing – it will be hidden there somewhere in the small print – so make sure you take a couple of minutes extra to check.

    If it's already too late and you are constantly flooded with "Adobe Flash Player is out of date" pop-ups, then please follow the steps in the removal guide below. If you have any questions, please leave a comment down below. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    "Adobe Flash Player is out of date" Pop-up Removal Guide:


    1. First of all, download anti-malware software and run a full system scan. It will detect and remove this infection from your computer. You may then follow the manual removal instructions below to remove the leftover traces of this malware. Hopefully you won't have to do that.





    2. Remove "Adobe Flash Player is out of date" pop-up related programs from your computer using the Add/Remove Programs control panel (Windows XP) or Uninstall a program control panel (Windows 7 and Windows 8).

    Go to the Start Menu. Select Control PanelAdd/Remove Programs.
    If you are using Windows Vista or Windows 7, select Control PanelUninstall a Program.



    If you are using Windows 8, simply drag your mouse pointer to the right edge of the screen, select Search from the list and search for "control panel".



    Or you can right-click on a bottom left hot corner (formerly known as the Start button) and select Control panel from there.



    3. When the Add/Remove Programs or the Uninstall a Program screen is displayed, scroll through the list of currently installed programs and remove the following:
    • GoSave
    • deals4me
    • SaveNewaAppz
    • and any other recently installed application


    Simply select each application and click Remove. If you are using Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8, click Uninstall up near the top of that window. When you're done, please close the Control Panel screen.

    Remove "Adobe Flash Player is out of date" pop-up related extensions from Google Chrome:

    1. Click on Chrome menu button. Go to ToolsExtensions.



    2. Click on the trashcan icon to remove deals4me, MediaPlayerV1, Gosave, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    If the removal option is grayed out then read how to remove extensions installed by enterprise policy.




    Remove "Adobe Flash Player is out of date" pop-up related extensions from Mozilla Firefox:

    1. Open Mozilla Firefox. Go to ToolsAdd-ons.



    2. Select Extensions. Click Remove button to remove deals4me, Gosave, MediaPlayerV1, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    Remove "Adobe Flash Player is out of date" pop-up related add-ons from Internet Explorer:

    1. Open Internet Explorer. Go to ToolsManage Add-ons. If you have the latest version, simply click on the Settings button.



    2. Select Toolbars and Extensions. Click Remove/Disable button to remove the browser add-ons listed above.

    Share this post


    Favicon How to Remove SalePlus Ads Malware (Uninstall Guide)
    20 Mar 2015, 8:49 pm
    I'm going to hazard a guess and say that because you are reading this you are looking to find out a little bit more about SalePlus adware. Most people that want to learn about it in more detail are keen to know what exactly it is, how it gets onto their PC – and what they can do to prevent it happening again in the future. It may be that you are already infected with this adware and see "Ads by SalePlus" on your computer. I shall be covering removal guide below.

    What is SalePlus?

    It's a computer program that has been created to show you advertising when you are connected to the Internet. Some of these adverts are links, others are banner or box ads by SalePlus and some are extremely annoying pop-up or pop-under windows. Some adverts may be for products or services you have zero interest in, while yet others are spookily similar – possibly even the same – as things that you have recently been looking at online.

    How does SalePlus end up on your computer?

    Normally you'll wind up with it on your computer because you downloaded or installed something on your device. More often than not this thing will be a freebie. It could be a file, a software program, a viewer that allows you to watch video clips, or an application. And there are not many of us these days who can say, hand on heart, that we don't regularly download TV series, music and games in our leisure time - and more useful tools or programs for our working lives too, of course. Therefore, that puts most of us in the high risk category, meaning we all stand a good chance of downloading this adware. I found an installer of a popular program called WhatsApp which obviously came from a dodgy website rather than the official one and as you can see it had SalePlus adware bundled with it.

    SalePlus is a plugin you can easily add to your browser, which enables you to get access to thousands of money-saving coupons and start getting special coupon offers while shopping online, and the best part is that all this is completely free for you! SalePlus is ad-supported software that is provided at no cost and may display advertisements in websites as you view them. This may include links by text-enhance and coupons from SalePlus.
    You may also have fallen prey to this adware by visiting a website that has been compromised and has malware hidden in it. This will trigger the installation and without so much as a warning you may have adware on your PC.

    Who creates or uses adware?

    Programmers who share or give away programs, apps, files or software for free need to cover their costs – and they normally do that by packaging adware with the freeware or shareware – the item they are letting you have at no cost. SalePlus is a great example of that.

    How do you know if you have SalePlus on your computer?

    Aside from the numerous adverts you are now seeing there are a number of other clear tell tale signs. These include your computer running more slowly, your Internet crashing frequently, and web pages being slow to load. You may also have spotted a new browser or home page that has been installed without your knowledge.

    How do you prevent adware from infecting you?

    Because SalePlus normally comes bundled with freeware or shareware you need to be careful when downloading and make sure you read the small print in License Agreements carefully – these will tell you, albeit not very clearly, what exactly you are installing. And – though we hope we don't really have to state the obvious – make sure you have a good anti-malware program installed on your computer! If it's already too late and your computer has been compromised, please follow the steps in the removal guide below. If you have any questions, please leave a comment down below. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    SalePlus Ads Removal Guide:


    1. First of all, download anti-malware software and run a full system scan. It will detect and remove this infection from your computer. You may then follow the manual removal instructions below to remove the leftover traces of this malware. Hopefully you won't have to do that.






    2. Remove SalePlus related programs from your computer using the Add/Remove Programs control panel (Windows XP) or Uninstall a program control panel (Windows 7 and Windows 8).

    Go to the Start Menu. Select Control PanelAdd/Remove Programs.
    If you are using Windows Vista or Windows 7, select Control PanelUninstall a Program.



    If you are using Windows 8, simply drag your mouse pointer to the right edge of the screen, select Search from the list and search for "control panel".



    Or you can right-click on a bottom left hot corner (formerly known as the Start button) and select Control panel from there.



    3. When the Add/Remove Programs or the Uninstall a Program screen is displayed, scroll through the list of currently installed programs and remove the following:
    • SalePlus
    • GoSave
    • deals4me
    • SaveNewaAppz
    • and any other recently installed application


    Simply select each application and click Remove. If you are using Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8, click Uninstall up near the top of that window. When you're done, please close the Control Panel screen.

    Remove SalePlus related extensions from Google Chrome:

    1. Click on Chrome menu button. Go to ToolsExtensions.



    2. Click on the trashcan icon to remove SalePlus, MediaPlayerV1, Gosave, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    If the removal option is grayed out then read how to remove extensions installed by enterprise policy.




    Remove SalePlus related extensions from Mozilla Firefox:

    1. Open Mozilla Firefox. Go to ToolsAdd-ons.



    2. Select Extensions. Click Remove button to remove SalePlus, Gosave, MediaPlayerV1, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    Remove Special Box related add-ons from Internet Explorer:

    1. Open Internet Explorer. Go to ToolsManage Add-ons. If you have the latest version, simply click on the Settings button.



    2. Select Toolbars and Extensions. Click Remove/Disable button to remove the browser add-ons listed above.

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    Favicon Remove sos@anointernet.com Ransom Virus and Restore Encrypted Files
    18 Mar 2015, 9:33 pm
    There's a new particularly unpleasant variant of malware that it is well worth knowing more about in order to protect your data and operating system is the sos@anointernet.com ransomware. First of all, let's clear one thing up about ransomware programs - they are not viruses, despite what many people think. A computer virus self replicates itself, while a ransom Trojan doesn't, however don't let this fool you into thinking they are not malicious - they definitely are! It uses a rather sophisticated cryptosystem to encrypt your files and then asks you to pay $300 or even more to have the files decrypted.


    How does sos@anointernet.com ransomware infect your computer?

    It's being distributed with the help of Trojan downloaders and as a standalone piece of malware as well. As you may know, Trojan downloaders present themselves to you as programs that have a certain perceived value. They might be disguised as an invoice via email or as the latest must-play game app. They can also be embedded in websites, packaged with a program or software that you've downloaded, or attachments or links in spam emails or instant messages. Cyber criminals use various methods, including social engineering, to infect as many computers as possible. After all, it's pretty obvious more encrypted data = more money.

    What does a ransom Trojan do?

    _sos@anointernet.com is not nice – that's for sure. It attacks your computer from within, destroying, corrupting or simply deleting your files, copying your data, slowing your operating system down until your PC is virtually unusable, changing your default settings and installing dew desktop icons or tool bars and generally causing you as much harm as possible. It can also install additional malware onto your PC, leaving your machine begging for mercy – and you tearing your hair out in frustration and sheer panic. This infection is actually very similar to the fud@india.com ransomware. The way both ransom viruses encrypt and change file extension to filename.id-xxxxxx_sos@anointernet.com makes me think that they are somehow connected. However, I couldn't find any links between these two infections yet. One thing is known for sure - it does encrypt your files. It also leaves a ransom note with instructions on how to get your files back. It possible that an e-mail to id-xxxxxx_sos@anointernet.com or just sos@anointernet.com might reply with instructions.

    How to protect your PC from this ransomware

    To increase the chances of staying as free as possible from sos@anointernet.com ransomware you need to make sure that you are running a decent anti-virus or anti-malware program on your computer. Installing a firewall is also a good idea as this helps to prevent threats from connecting with your computer. The more protection and lines of defense the better. Of course, we hope we shouldn't have to say it, but don't open emails from unknown senders, and definitely don't click on attachments or links contained within them. Even if you do recognize the sender, it is still a very good idea to be cautious as you never know if the email is spam and designed to look like it comes from a trusted company or brand, or if a friend or co-worker has been hacked.

    Is there a way to recover my files?

    Unfortunately, at this time there is no way to decrypt the files without your unique decryption key which can be bought from cyber criminals for almost $300. Do not pay the ransom. Instead, follow the removal guide below how to salvage your data and clean your computer ASAP. There are a few tools that can help you to restore at least some of your files without paying a ransom.

    And now you're done reading this, may I suggest that you back up all your files onto an external hard drive NOW. That way if you are unlucky enough to fall victim to ransomware, you'll be able to simply wipe clean your internal disk drive and replace it with up to date data.

    If you have any questions, please leave a comment below. To remove fud@india.com ransom virus, please follow the steps in the removal guide below. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    Step 1: Removing sos@anointernet.com virus and related malware:


    Before restoring your files from shadow copies, make sure sos@anointernet.com ransomware is not running. You have to remove this malware permanently. Thankfully, there are a couple of anti-malware programs that will effectively detect and remove this malware from your computer.

    1. First of all, download and install recommended anti-malware scanner. Run a full system scan and remove detected malware.





    Important! If you can't download or run it, please restart your computer in Safe Mode with Networking or Safe Mode and try again.

    2. Then, download ESET Online Scanner and run a second scan to make sure there are no other malware running on your computer.

    That's it! Your computer should be clean now and you can safely restore your files. Proceed to Step 2.


    Step 2: Restoring files encrypted by sos@anointernet.com virus:


    Method 1: The first and best method is to restore your files from a recent backup. If you have been regularly performing backups, then you should use your backups to restore your files.

    Method 2: Try to restore previous versions of files using Windows folder tools. To learn more, please read Previous versions of files.

    Method 3: Using the Shadow Volume Copies:

    1. Download and install Shadow Explorer. Note, this tool is available with Windows XP Service Pack 2, Windows Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8.

    2. Open Shadow Explorer. From the drop down list you can select from one of the available point-in-time Shadow Copies. Select drive and the latest date that you wish to restore from.



    3. Righ-click any encrypted file or entire folder and Export it. You will then be prompted as to where you would like to restore the contents of the folder to.



    Hopefully, this will help you to restore all encrypted files or at least some of them.

    Share this post


    Favicon What is db444.exe and how to remove it?
    18 Mar 2015, 8:36 pm

    db444.exe - Trj/Genetic.gen.


    What is db444.exe?


    db444.exe has been detected as a Trojan horse by multiple anti-virus programs. Trojan Horse computer programs are equally as sly – and potentially equally as harmful to your computer as their wooden counterpart of yore was to Troy. A Trojan Horse will be disguised as a regular, legitimate program. You want, or need, this new program so you install or run it on your PC – and what do you know? You have been duped into executing a Trojan Horse. db444.exe may also be spread via emails or instant messenger applications. You'll receive a mail or a message from an unknown user, albeit one that looks perfectly legit, however the attachment or link contained within will be infected with a Trojan Horse. Opening the file or clicking on the link will trigger the download. Db444.exe infection is extremely unpleasant. It can make changes to your hard drive, corrupt – or even delete - your files and steal your data. Some variants of this Trojan horse, which are known as Backdoor Trojans, give the developer the ability to remotely access your computer and operate it from afar, turning it into what is known as a zombie computer. Far less entertaining than The Walking Dead, this is obviously frightening - and a gross infringement of your privacy. What is more, once infected your computer will become noticeably slower. It can also display error pop-ups and messages as show in the image below. Needles to say, I recommend you to remove db444.exe and related malware from your computer. Run a full system scan with anti-malware software.





    File name: db444.exe
    Publisher: Unknown
    File Location Windows XP: C:\Windows\TEMP\db444.exe
    File Location Windows 7/8: C:\Windows\TEMP\db444.exe
    Startup file: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run → db444.exe

    Here's an example of an error caused by db444.exe malware:





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    Favicon How to Remove VaultCrypt Virus and Restore Encrypted Files
    17 Mar 2015, 8:13 pm
    VaultCrypt is a ransomware threat that uses RSA 1024 cryptosystem to encrypt your files and then asks you to pay 1 Bitcoin (about $270) to have the files decrypted. It's a quite sophisticated ransomware which uses a very effective file encryption technique and well build payment site. Unlike other CryptoWall 3.0 or CryptoLocker, it doesn't use ransom note (usually a text file) explaining what had happened to your files and how to get them back. This ransomware scans your computer for MS office files, pictures, database files and zip archives and encrypts them. Then it adds a .vault extension to each encrypted file's name. When you double-clicked on an encrypted .vault file, instead of the file opening, a pop-pup message would be shown stating that the file was "Stored in Vault" and that you needed to go to a certain website to get your decryption key. VaultCrypt does this by modifying Windows registry so that every time you try to open an infected file you will get this pop-up message.


    Decryption service website looks pretty solid. It has news section and even chat which actually works. And of course, there are web pages for decryption and payment. Cyber criminals set a deadline for payment. If you won't make it on time (in 7 days) cyber criminals will increase the amount of money you need to pay in order to get your files back.

    We all know that thanks to the increasing amount of time we spend connected to the Internet that we are at increasing risk of falling victim to VaultCrypt virus infestation. You don't need to be a geek to realize that hot on the heels of every new software, application or upgrade that is released, so too are their malicious counterparts. Just as Microsoft or Adobe are always fighting to stay one step ahead and offer products and services that their audience will snap up, so too are malware developers using their 'talents' to find out new ways to exploit them – and us.

    So how does a computer user stay safe when we are faced with a constant onslaught of attacks, risks and threats? There are so many different types of malicious software that it can seem nigh on impossible. However, knowledge is power and learning as much as you are able will increase your chances of staying safe. This nasty malware appears to come and go – sometimes ransomware attacks are all over the technology news – and then the stories die down. Regardless, ransomware is definitely something that you should take a few minutes out of your day to learn about.

    What is VaultCrypt?

    You know spyware spies on you and adware shows you adverts, so if you're wondering whether ransomware is something that can hold you hostage, you are not far off the mark. If you have been infected by VaultCrypt it will 'kidnap' your files and hold them hostage until you pay for their release. It's a classic and time worn method of extorting money – the only difference is now we're dealing with online kidnapping. But this one is even more evil. It tries to delete shadow copies and even restore points to make it nearly impossible to restore your files. Luckily, it does not always succeeds, so there is a chance you can recover your original unencrypted data files using file recovery programs. Please see the removal guide below.

    How does this ransomware infect a computer?

    Just like most other types of malware, VaultCrypt will launch an attack on you after you download a software program or app that it has been bundled with. It can also be triggered if you open an email with an infected attachment or link, or through a website that has been compromised. This is known as a 'drive-by installation'. It can also arrive on the affected computer through exploit kits hosted through malicious ads or compromised sites, or other malware.

    How do you know if you've been infected by VaultCrypt virus?

    It is not designed to be subtle – after all it wants your money and it wants it now. Generally speaking you will find that you are unable to open a file or document and see that it has a .vault extension appended to each encrypted file's name. Not unsurprisingly this causes many people to panic – particularly if they are unlucky enough to have been targeted by the type of ransomware that sends you alerts that appear to have been sent by the FBI! Of course, it is in the programmer's best interests to scare you into capitulating to their demands and paying their ransom. And clearly receiving a warning from the FBI is going to be enough to frighten most people!

    Is there a way to recover my files?

    Unfortunately, at this time there is no way to decrypt the files without your unique decryption key which can be bought from cyber criminals for almost $300. Do not pay the ransom. Instead, follow the removal guide below how to salvage your data and clean your computer ASAP. There are a few tools that can help you to restore at least some of your files without paying a ransom.

    If you have any questions, please leave a comment below. If there's anything you think I should add or correct, please let me know. And now you're done reading this, may I suggest that you back up all your files onto an external hard drive NOW. That way if you are unlucky enough to fall victim to VaultCrypt, you'll be able to simply wipe clean your internal disk drive and replace it with up to date data.

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    Step 1: Removing VaultCrypt and related malware:


    Before restoring your files from shadow copies, make sure VaultCrypt is not running. You have to remove this malware permanently. Thankfully, there are a couple of anti-malware programs that will effectively detect and remove this malware from your computer.

    1. First of all, download and install recommended anti-malware scanner. Run a full system scan and remove detected malware.





    Important! If you can't download or run it, please restart your computer in Safe Mode with Networking or Safe Mode and try again.

    2. Then, download ESET Online Scanner and run a second scan to make sure there are no other malware running on your computer.

    That's it! Your computer should be clean now and you can safely restore your files. Proceed to Step 2.


    Step 2: Restoring files encrypted by VaultCrypt virus:


    Method 1: The first and best method is to restore your files from a recent backup. If you have been regularly performing backups, then you should use your backups to restore your files.

    Method 2: Try to restore previous versions of files using Windows folder tools. To learn more, please read Previous versions of files.

    Method 3: Using the Shadow Volume Copies:

    1. Download and install Shadow Explorer. Note, this tool is available with Windows XP Service Pack 2, Windows Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8.

    2. Open Shadow Explorer. From the drop down list you can select from one of the available point-in-time Shadow Copies. Select drive and the latest date that you wish to restore from.



    3. Righ-click any encrypted file or entire folder and Export it. You will then be prompted as to where you would like to restore the contents of the folder to.



    Hopefully, this will help you to restore all encrypted files or at least some of them.

    Share this post


    Favicon How to Remove "Ads by Ad Browser" Malware (Uninstall Guide)
    16 Mar 2015, 9:15 pm
    Just in case you've been getting "Ads by Ad Browser" recently and you don't know hot to remove them, hopefully this article will clear up the mystery for you! Adware is all over the Internet these days and is a type of software that has been designed to display adverts on your computer. If that sounds like not such a big deal and you're wondering what all the fuss is about, you might also be interested to know that Ad Browser adware also monitors which websites you visit, and the goods or services that you look at when you are on those websites.

    Why does it do this? It is so that it is able to tailor make the Ad Browser ads that you see to meet your requirements or match your interests. And if you're still thinking that this doesn't sound particularly bad – in fact it may even seem quite handy – don't forget that this means that an anonymous third party is watching what you are doing whenever you are connected to the Internet.


    And that's not all because so that it, or more accurately the adware's programmer, can see what sites you browse, the Ad Browser installs a tracking component onto your PC. And it is precisely this component that can cause you issues. For a start it is using your Internet connection to relay the data it collects on you back to the programmer and that slows down your connection to the point that it might even cause your browser to keep on crashing. The component is also working away behind the scenes of your computer and that in turn can slow your CPU right down too.

    In addition to this, as if that wasn't enough to contend with, advertising supported software often makes it easier for other types of malware to infect your computer – namely spyware, which is similar to the tracking component but takes its monitoring activity to a whole new level.

    So the big question is – how do you protect yourself from Ad Browser and stop it from installing itself on your PC?

    The good news is that there are a number of things you can do to try and avoid the menace of adware. Here are some of the main ones:
    • Install (and run regularly) good anti-malware software
    • Do not download software or applications from third party websites – download directly from the publisher wherever possible
    • Don't open files or click on links in emails or instant messages if you don't recognize the sender
    • If you are downloading something ensure you read the License Agreement properly so you know just what it is you are installing
    • Install pop-up blockers and a firewall
    • If you encounter any pop-up windows – including Ad Browser ads – to close them click the little red 'x' in the corner of the pop-up. 'OK' or 'Close' buttons can be rigged so that if you click on them they trigger another installation – such as more adware or another type of malware
    If it's already to late and your computer is infected then please follow the steps in the removal guide below to remove Ad Browser adware. If you have any questions, please leave a comment down below. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    Ad Browser Ads Removal Guide:


    1. First of all, download anti-malware software and run a full system scan. It will detect and remove this infection from your computer. You may then follow the manual removal instructions below to remove the leftover traces of this malware. Hopefully you won't have to do that.





    2. Remove Ad Browser related programs from your computer using the Add/Remove Programs control panel (Windows XP) or Uninstall a program control panel (Windows 7 and Windows 8).

    Go to the Start Menu. Select Control PanelAdd/Remove Programs.
    If you are using Windows Vista or Windows 7, select Control PanelUninstall a Program.



    If you are using Windows 8, simply drag your mouse pointer to the right edge of the screen, select Search from the list and search for "control panel".



    Or you can right-click on a bottom left hot corner (formerly known as the Start button) and select Control panel from there.



    3. When the Add/Remove Programs or the Uninstall a Program screen is displayed, scroll through the list of currently installed programs and remove the following:
    • Ad Browser
    • GoSave
    • deals4me
    • SaveNewaAppz
    • and any other recently installed application


    Simply select each application and click Remove. If you are using Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8, click Uninstall up near the top of that window. When you're done, please close the Control Panel screen.

    Remove Ad Browser related extensions from Google Chrome:

    1. Click on Chrome menu button. Go to ToolsExtensions.



    2. Click on the trashcan icon to remove Ad Browser 1.0.1, MediaPlayerV1, Gosave, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    If the removal option is grayed out then read how to remove extensions installed by enterprise policy.




    Remove Ad Browser related extensions from Mozilla Firefox:

    1. Open Mozilla Firefox. Go to ToolsAdd-ons.



    2. Select Extensions. Click Remove button to remove Ad Browser 1.0.1, Gosave, MediaPlayerV1, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    Remove Ad Browser related add-ons from Internet Explorer:

    1. Open Internet Explorer. Go to ToolsManage Add-ons. If you have the latest version, simply click on the Settings button.



    2. Select Toolbars and Extensions. Click Remove/Disable button to remove the browser add-ons listed above.

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    Favicon Remove megacode@alphamail10.com Ransom Virus and Restore Encrypted Files
    16 Mar 2015, 8:44 pm
    There are a number of different ransomware strains doing the rounds at any given time - you may well have heard of the vicious megacode@alphamail10.com or just megacode ransom virus one in particular - however most types of this thoroughly unpleasant malware work in the same way. Most people these days have heard of many of the different types of malware, including Trojan Horses, Spyware, Adware and Potentially Unwanted Programs but one form of malicious software that only seems to get flagged up on our radars every so often, and therefore doesn't get quite the same amount of publicity is ransomware. But that is not to say that you should not be fully aware of the risks or the dangers associated with this particularly vicious attacker.

    Ransomware can also be known as cryptoware, a cryptovirus, a cryptoworm or a cryprotrojan - all of which sound equally menacing and unpleasant, we are sure you will agree! So what is megacode@alphamail10.com ransomware, how does it disseminate itself, what effect can it have on your computer - and quite possibly your sanity - and how do you avoid being infected by it for a start?

    How does megacode@alphamail10.com ransom virus infect your PC?

    It is spread via attachments in emails, by programs that have been infected by it, and also by websites that have been compromised. What this means for you is that being very careful about what messages you open, what programs you download and what websites you visit is now more crucial than ever before.

    What is the point of ransomware?

    Ransomware, as the name suggests, has one main reason for being - and that is to extort money from you, using one of a number of different tactics, namely being by holding your files to ransom. In this case, cyber criminals simply leave a text note saying that your need to contact them via email megacode@alphamail10.com. It might not be the same for everyone. I'm pretty sure cyber criminals have more than one email address but for now let's say it's a megacode virus. By the way, it's not so well coded as for example CryptoWall 3.0 or CryptoLocker but ir does encrypt your files and it's not a joke. Actually, it reminds me of the fud@india.com ransomware.

    How does it operate?

    If you've been attacked by megacode@alphamail10.com virus you will soon realize that you are unable to access any, or even all, of your files or documents. You will attempt to do so only to receive a ransom letter in the form of an text file that is asking for (or demanding, to be more accurate) a sum of money. In return for this ransom, the cyber criminal tells you that they will send you a key that will enable you to unlock your file.

    They will normally also try and scare you into paying quickly by telling you that if you don't submit to their demands by a specified deadline that they will destroy the key - therefore eliminating any chance of you from ever being able to open your file and access its data again.

    And that's not all because to dial the fear factor up to eleven, your file's 'kidnapper' may even try and convince you that you are about to become a person of interest in a police or federal inquiry. You will be told that, after investigation, you have been found either visiting websites or downloading programs of an illegal nature. And, what do you know, you will of course be given the chance to escape legal action by paying another fine!

    As mentioned above, be careful what you download and which sites you visit - and backup your data on a regular basis. That way, if you do fall victim to megacode@alphamail10.com you can ignore their demands, wipe your disk drive and start over. Or you can remove this ransom virus from your computer and restore at least some of your files using Shadow Explorer. To do so, please follow the steps in the removal guide below. If you have any questions, please leave a comment down below. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    Step 1: Removing megacode@alphamail10.com virus and related malware:


    Before restoring your files from shadow copies, make sure megacode@alphamail10.com ransomware is not running. You have to remove this malware permanently. Thankfully, there are a couple of anti-malware programs that will effectively detect and remove this malware from your computer.

    1. First of all, download and install recommended anti-malware scanner. Run a full system scan and remove detected malware.





    Important! If you can't download or run it, please restart your computer in Safe Mode with Networking or Safe Mode and try again.

    2. Then, download ESET Online Scanner and run a second scan to make sure there are no other malware running on your computer.

    That's it! Your computer should be clean now and you can safely restore your files. Proceed to Step 2.


    Step 2: Restoring files encrypted by megacode@alphamail10.com virus:


    Method 1: The first and best method is to restore your files from a recent backup. If you have been regularly performing backups, then you should use your backups to restore your files.

    Method 2: Try to restore previous versions of files using Windows folder tools. To learn more, please read Previous versions of files.

    Method 3: Using the Shadow Volume Copies:

    1. Download and install Shadow Explorer. Note, this tool is available with Windows XP Service Pack 2, Windows Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8.

    2. Open Shadow Explorer. From the drop down list you can select from one of the available point-in-time Shadow Copies. Select drive and the latest date that you wish to restore from.



    3. Righ-click any encrypted file or entire folder and Export it. You will then be prompted as to where you would like to restore the contents of the folder to.



    Hopefully, this will help you to restore all encrypted files or at least some of them.

    Share this post


    Favicon How to Remove Special Box Ads Malware (Uninstall Guide)
    15 Mar 2015, 9:26 pm
    One thing that many people seem to be divided on is whether Special Box is actually a type of malicious software. Some people see it as an innocent and unavoidable aspect of using the Internet while others hold firm the belief that it is a proper form of malware. The fact is that most experts are in agreement that adware, or advertising supported software to give it its true title, is actually malicious software. Part of the reason for this is the way in which it is downloaded on to your computer, and part of it is due to the fact that it can track your every move when you're connected to the Internet and of course display Special Box ads on pretty much every website you visit. Besides, it's from the same family as BrowseFox malware.

    Special Box ads, in whatever shape or form they comes in, can be somewhat intrusive. In fact it can be increasingly difficult to escape advertising. In this day and age we are under constant attack by marketers and brands all trying to get us to spend our hard earned dollar on their products or services. And as we all spend increasing amounts of time online, of course, the Internet is no refuge from the barrage.


    However, online advertising can vary wildly; from adverts that hold a genuine interest – perhaps you're seeing adverts on the websites you visit for a camera that you have just been looking at (more on how that happens shortly) – or maybe you are seeing pop-up adverts for a manga style gaming website that you have zero interest in.

    Going back to the Special Box adverts that are very similar to products you have recently been browsing for a moment: how does the Internet KNOW which adverts to show you? How does the website you're reading the news on know that a couple of hours before you were looking at cameras? That's all down to the tracking component that Special Box adware installs on your computer when you download the adware. This component monitors which websites you visit, looks at the pages or products you are looking at within that site, and sends the data back to the adware's developer – who then makes sure you only see adverts for products that you have a high likelihood of clicking on.

    However, returning again to the pop-up style adverts that we also mentioned, if you're seeing Special Box ads it is a fair indication that you have the true malware style of advertising supported software on your computer. As well as the aforementioned gaming sites, these adverts can also be for porn, gambling or crazy weight loss methods. And the worst thing about these ads is that they simply won't go away. The pop-up windows will return time and time again, no matter how many times you click on them – leaving you tearing your hair out in frustration and wondering just what is going on with your computer.

    The other major issue with pop-up ads and this type of adware is that you are also being made vulnerable to threats of an even more serious nature. Special Box can negatively impact on other programs running on your PC, weakening your computer's defense and increasing the chances of you being infected by even nastier types of malware. It constantly runs in the background as a utilSpecialBox.exe program and checks for updates. It can download and install other malware on your computer as well. To remove Special Box ads from your computer, please follow the steps in the removal guide below. If you have any questions, please leave a comment down below. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    Special Box Ads Removal Guide:


    1. First of all, download anti-malware software and run a full system scan. It will detect and remove this infection from your computer. You may then follow the manual removal instructions below to remove the leftover traces of this malware. Hopefully you won't have to do that.





    2. Remove Round World related programs from your computer using the Add/Remove Programs control panel (Windows XP) or Uninstall a program control panel (Windows 7 and Windows 8).

    Go to the Start Menu. Select Control PanelAdd/Remove Programs.
    If you are using Windows Vista or Windows 7, select Control PanelUninstall a Program.



    If you are using Windows 8, simply drag your mouse pointer to the right edge of the screen, select Search from the list and search for "control panel".



    Or you can right-click on a bottom left hot corner (formerly known as the Start button) and select Control panel from there.



    3. When the Add/Remove Programs or the Uninstall a Program screen is displayed, scroll through the list of currently installed programs and remove the following:
    • Special Box
    • GoSave
    • deals4me
    • SaveNewaAppz
    • and any other recently installed application


    Simply select each application and click Remove. If you are using Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8, click Uninstall up near the top of that window. When you're done, please close the Control Panel screen.

    Remove Special Box related extensions from Google Chrome:

    1. Click on Chrome menu button. Go to ToolsExtensions.



    2. Click on the trashcan icon to remove Special Box 1.0.1, MediaPlayerV1, Gosave, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    If the removal option is grayed out then read how to remove extensions installed by enterprise policy.




    Remove Special Box related extensions from Mozilla Firefox:

    1. Open Mozilla Firefox. Go to ToolsAdd-ons.



    2. Select Extensions. Click Remove button to remove Special Box 1.0.1, Gosave, MediaPlayerV1, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    Remove Special Box related add-ons from Internet Explorer:

    1. Open Internet Explorer. Go to ToolsManage Add-ons. If you have the latest version, simply click on the Settings button.



    2. Select Toolbars and Extensions. Click Remove/Disable button to remove the browser add-ons listed above.

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    Favicon Remove Jorikestnoski.com Ad Malware (Uninstall Guide)
    15 Mar 2015, 8:53 pm
    Jorikestnoski.com is an ad-riddled webpage being spammed through popular web services like Steam or Spotify. It's an adware issue, so these services have nothing to do with it. Jorikestnoski.com can pop-up on your computer when it's infected with adware as well. It can be tempting to dismiss adware as something that won't be a problem. After all, you know you don't download pirated software, you don't visit websites of a disreputable nature and you're pretty sure your anti-virus is more than capable of protecting you. Well, take a look at the figures and you might be surprised because according to malware experts, in excess of 90% of PC users have some type of malicious software installed on their computer at any given time. That's a frighteningly huge amount.


    As well as being irritating, many people take issue with jorikestnoski.com for the fact that the adverts that you see on websites are often almost exact matches for products you have been looking at online. And that's because it installs a tracking component on your PC which monitors which websites you are looking at. This data is then relayed to the adware developer who uses it to tailor the adverts to your recent searches. It's not a pleasant thought that some unknown third party is watching your every move and knows exactly which websites you are visiting – no matter how innocuous they may be. If you've been recently searching for a car then it will display ads for best car deals, etc. You get the idea. Sometimes, jorikestnoski.com pop-up ads can be completely random. One way or another, it's a threat and has to be removed from your computer.

    Because it normally comes bundled with another program you need to make sure you read T's & C's carefully when downloading. The adware will normally be mentioned in the small print so make sure that you don't just skip through this but read it in full. Yes it's boring, yes you just want to get to your download, but it beats being infected by this nuisance! To remove this malware from your computer, please follow the steps in the removal guide below. Most of the time, it comes bundled with other potentially unwanted programs and browser hijackers and you certainly don't want to miss those too. If you have questions, leave a down comment below. I will be more than happy to help you. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com


    Jorikestnoski.com Ad Malware Removal Guide:

    1. First of all, download recommended anti-malware software and run a full system scan. It will detect and remove this infection from your computer.





    NOTE: If you are using Internet Explorer and can't download anti-malware software because "Your current security settings do not allow this file to be downloaded" then please reset IE security settings and try again.

    2. Download and run TDSSKiller. Press the button Start scan for the utility to start scanning.



    3. Wait for the scan and disinfection process to be over. Then click Continue. Please reboot your computer after the disinfection is over.



    4. Open the Run Command (press Windows key + R) and type inetcpl.cpl, then go to the last tab (Advanced) at the top and use both reset buttons. Check the box to delete all settings on the second reset.

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    Favicon Encrypted Files (.ecc extension) Malware Removal Guide
    14 Mar 2015, 8:55 pm
    If most of your files are encrypted and have a .ecc extension, for example work.docx.ecc, then your computer is almost certainly infected with TeslaCrypt ransomware. Obviously, encrypted files cannot be opened by the standard program. They must be decrypted first but the problem is that you need to purchase your private key using TeslaCrypt service in order to do so. You don't have to be a techie whizz kid to know that cyber criminals, malware users and hackers are increasingly upping the ante in their attempts to defraud, scam, phish and extort computer users – such as you and me – out of our hard earned money.

    There are more than enough different types of malicious software out there to keep us on our toes, but one of the most unpleasant ones is ransomware which seems to rear its ugly head in fits and starts, rather than being a constant on the malware landscape. However just because it appears to come and go is not reason to ignore it for ransomware is something that can cause untold stress, both on you and on your bank account, if you are not careful.

    What exactly is TeslaCrypt ransomware?

    The name probably gives it away, or at least holds a clue as to what this particular Internet based menace can do and how it operates. To cut a long story short, ransomware infests your computer, kidnaps one or more of your files, changes file extension to .ecc, holds them hostage – and then, as a natural conclusion, demands a ransom from you to let them go free.


    How does it infect my PC?

    As with most types of computer virus or malware, ransomware infects you via email carrying an infected attachment or link. It can also disseminate itself through other programs or it may employ a technique called a drive-by installation – this is when you visit a website that has been compromised.

    You may notice that something is amiss on your computer when you suddenly find that you can't access a particular file or document, when you receive a ransom note – i.e. an email - or you are shown a screen or pop-up window alerting you. Usually these emails or alerts will appear to have been sent by a reputable organization such as the FBI or other national law enforcement agency. This of course would have the majority of us shocked into stunned silence (or possibly letting slip a few choice curse words!)

    But what am I "guilty" of?

    The email or warning will tell you that you have infringed some sort of serious law: maybe you've been "caught" looking at some dubious x-rated content or downloading pirated software or movies, for example.

    Then, still pretending that a genuine federal or law agency were behind the message, you will then be shown how much you are being penalized and the amount of the fine you need to pay to atone for your "wrongdoing". But don't worry, this untoward third party will make it nice and easy for you to pay – this will either be by using an (untraceable) pre-paid card or Bitcoins, the digital currency.

    Should I pay the fine?

    No. Do not encourage these online scammers; no reputable law enforcement agency uses these tactics. If you have a recent backup, wipe your hard disk and reinstall your files. If you don't, try Shadow Explorer program or search your computer for previous versions of files. If you are lucky enough you may find files that were not encrypted and renamed to .ecc. But before restoring your files, please remove the ransomware and related malware files from your computer. Otherwise, you will simply waste your time. If you have any questions, please leave a comment down below. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com


    Step 1: Removing TeslaCrypt and related malware:


    Before restoring your files from shadow copies, make sure TeslaCrypt is not running. You have to remove this malware permanently. Thankfully, there are a couple of anti-malware programs that will effectively detect and remove this malware from your computer.

    1. First of all, download and install recommended anti-malware scanner. Run a full system scan and remove detected malware.





    Important! If you can't download or run it, please restart your computer in Safe Mode with Networking or Safe Mode and try again.

    2. Then, download ESET Online Scanner and run a second scan to make sure there are no other malware running on your computer.

    That's it! Your computer should be clean now and you can safely restore your files. Proceed to Step 2.


    Step 2: Restoring files encrypted by TeslaCrypt virus:


    Method 1: The first and best method is to restore your files from a recent backup. If you have been regularly performing backups, then you should use your backups to restore your files.

    Method 2: Try to restore previous versions of files using Windows folder tools. To learn more, please read Previous versions of files.

    Method 3: Using the Shadow Volume Copies:

    1. Download and install Shadow Explorer. Note, this tool is available with Windows XP Service Pack 2, Windows Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8.

    2. Open Shadow Explorer. From the drop down list you can select from one of the available point-in-time Shadow Copies. Select drive and the latest date that you wish to restore from.



    3. Righ-click any encrypted file or entire folder and Export it. You will then be prompted as to where you would like to restore the contents of the folder to.



    Hopefully, this will help you to restore all encrypted files or at least some of them.

    Share this post


    Favicon How to Remove PUP.Optional.Winsock.Hijack (Uninstall Guide)
    14 Mar 2015, 7:37 pm
    PUP.Optional.Winsock.Hijack is often referred to in the same breath as malware. But is it really as bad as some people would have us believe? After all we all know about the dangers of spyware, Trojan Horse malware, viruses and worms, but when something has the word 'potentially' in the title it can be tempting to see it as somewhat less of a threat.

    It has to be said, in favor of PUPs (Potentially Unwanted Programs) that they don't steal your data, they won't plunder your bank account or rack up a hideous bill on your credit card, they don't take creepy screen shots or log the keys that you type and they don't corrupt your files and hold them to ransom like most ransomware do – so what do they do? And why does the question often arise: is PUP.Optional.Winsock.Hijack malware?

    What is PUP.Optional.Winsock.Hijack?

    A PUP is so called – i.e. potentially unwanted – thanks to the program's manner of installing itself and its unique characteristics. It goes without saying that this is a program. However why might it be unwanted? That's because PUPs actually do have a use: for the most part they are toolbars and browsers or home pages. So far, so good – so who might not want this new search option? Well most of us really. Any toolbar or browser that a PUP installs will replace your existing one and let's face it – a toolbar created by someone who uses underhand methods to sneak it onto your PC is probably not going to have Google shaking in their boots with their rival offering. This particular variant called PUP.Optional.Winsock.Hijack is a part of a browser hijacker that modifies Internet settings and can redirect you to ad-riddled websites. It probably won't install a toolbar but change your browser's settings.

    Your new start page or home page will be confusing – just by the very fact that you were used to your old one. And it won't have nearly the same level of functionality. But does this make it malware? Well no, it doesn't. Genuine malware exhibits truly harmful behavior - Potentially Unwanted Programs like PUP.Optional.Winsock.Hijack are for the most part, just annoying. And that is why they are only 'potentially' unwanted.

    However, you might not be quite so ambivalent about your new program when you realize that it takes great joy in redirecting all of your Internet searches to websites that the PUP's creator or owner wants you to visit – whether you like it or not. Picture it, you need to book a last minute flight to attend an urgent business meeting in another state, or to visit a sick friend or family member, but every time you enter the name or URL of your favorite discount flight provider, you're redirected to a gambling website. Frustrating – and ultimately problematic.

    A thin line between malware and... not malware

    Okay, so PUP.Optional.Winsock.Hijack might not be as destructive as a malware program that has been designed to capture your online bank details and who knows but how comfortable are you with having something installed on your computer that used guerrilla tactics to get there in the first place?

    Most anti-virus programs will allow you to choose what to do with this program, either keep it or get rid of it. I suggest you to remove PUP.Optional.Winsock.Hijack from your computer and run a full system scan with anti-malware software. Most of the time, it comes bundled with adware and even spyware. So, it might be not the only nuisance installed on your computer. If you have any questions, please leave a comment down below. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    PUP.Optional.Winsock.Hijack Removal Guide:


    1. First of all, download anti-malware software and run a full system scan. It will detect and remove this infection from your computer. You may then follow the manual removal instructions below to remove the leftover traces of this malware. Hopefully you won't have to do that.





    2. Remove PUP.Optional.Winsock.Hijack related programs from your computer using the Add/Remove Programs control panel (Windows XP) or Uninstall a program control panel (Windows 7 and Windows 8).

    Go to the Start Menu. Select Control PanelAdd/Remove Programs.
    If you are using Windows Vista or Windows 7, select Control PanelUninstall a Program.



    If you are using Windows 8, simply drag your mouse pointer to the right edge of the screen, select Search from the list and search for "control panel".



    Or you can right-click on a bottom left hot corner (formerly known as the Start button) and select Control panel from there.



    3. When the Add/Remove Programs or the Uninstall a Program screen is displayed, scroll through the list of currently installed programs and remove the following:
    • GoSave
    • deals4me
    • SaveNewaAppz
    • and any other recently installed application


    Simply select each application and click Remove. If you are using Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8, click Uninstall up near the top of that window. When you're done, please close the Control Panel screen.

    Remove PUP.Optional.Winsock.Hijack related extensions from Google Chrome:

    1. Click on Chrome menu button. Go to ToolsExtensions.



    2. Click on the trashcan icon to remove GoSave, deals4me, MediaPlayerV1, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    If the removal option is grayed out then read how to remove extensions installed by enterprise policy.




    Remove PUP.Optional.Winsock.Hijack related extensions from Mozilla Firefox:

    1. Open Mozilla Firefox. Go to ToolsAdd-ons.



    2. Select Extensions. Click Remove button to remove GoSave, deals4me, MediaPlayerV1, HD-Plus 3.5 and other extensions that you do not recognize.

    Remove PUP.Optional.Winsock.Hijack related add-ons from Internet Explorer:

    1. Open Internet Explorer. Go to ToolsManage Add-ons. If you have the latest version, simply click on the Settings button.



    2. Select Toolbars and Extensions. Click Remove/Disable button to remove the browser add-ons listed above.

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    Favicon Remove SecurityHelper.dll Trojan Virus (Uninstall Guide)
    12 Mar 2015, 8:53 pm
    SecurityHelper.dll is a part of a Trojan virus that belongs to the Win32/Sathurbot malware family. Most of the time, it comes bundled with Backdoor:Win32/Simda.A Trojan horse. It's a backdoor Trojan and can be controlled remotely. In other words, cyber criminals can access your computer or use it as as proxy for illegal activities and/or attacks on other computers. The Trojan acquires data and commands from a remote computer controlled by cyber criminals. Once installed, it creates copies of itself and one of the files is named securityhelper.dll. It is usually located in C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Security\Client\ folder. Other malicious files are stored in %Temp% folder. What steps should you take if you want to avoid becoming a victim to one of the above dangers or annoyances? Well because this Trojan comes in so many shapes and sizes, here we're going to narrow it down a little and take a closer look at just one of those threats; in this case, SecurityHelper.dll.


    Hackers and malware programmers use increasingly sophisticated methods to ensure their program makes its way on to our computers - and stays there for as long as possible. There are big bucks in malware and unwanted programs after all!

    So what does this Trojan virus do? Generally speaking, they have been created to drive traffic to websites controlled by cyber criminals and also to steal various information from infected computers. But instead of doing this through the use of spyware, they decided to use Win32/Sathurbot family malicious programs that not only steal information but allow access to infected computers.

    As well as outbound traffic, it will also display a number of other disagreeable traits. It might go one step further and install adware on your PC. As if the constant redirects to other websites weren't bad enough, now you have to deal with relentless pop up adverts. And adware has the knock on effect of slowing your computer's CPU down, causing files and programs to open slowly and your Internet to be slow to respond and crash frequently. So, as you can see, securityhelper.dll can cause some serious problems to your computer and of course completely compromises your PC's security.

    Trojans are always disguised as programs which seem to be of use, or at least interesting or entertaining and if you fall for their ploy, it won’t be long before you've unwittingly unleashed a full scale nightmare onto your computer.

    Things to look out for – especially if they're sending you unsolicited invites to download them – are the latest security patches for software that you have installed, or some other supposedly required programs. How ironic! All you need do is click on a link or open an attachment sent in a spam email or by a rogue instant message and the Trojan Horse will execute itself and download its components on to your PC.

    Spam email and instant messenger apps are big culprits, and will try and tempt you into installing the Trojan Horse through various enticing links or attachments. Peer to Peer files are another popular method used by malicious software programs. You may even find yourself at the mercy of a Trojan Horse simply by visiting a website that has been targeted by the programmer, which, while still extremely annoying, means that at least you can't really blame yourself for clicking on a rogue link in an email!

    To remove securityhelper.dll Trojan virus and other threats from Win32/Sathurbot malware family that may have been installed on your computer, please follow the removal guide below. If you have questions, leave a down comment below. I will be more than happy to help you. Good luck and be safe online!

    Written by Michael Kaur, http://deletemalware.blogspot.com



    SecurityHelper.dll Trojan Removal Guide:


    1. First of all, download recommended anti-malware software and run a full system scan. It will detect and remove this infection from your computer.






    NOTE: If you are using Internet Explorer and can't download anti-malware software because "Your current security settings do not allow this file to be downloaded" then please reset IE security settings and try again.

    2. Download and run TDSSKiller. Press the button Start scan for the utility to start scanning.



    3. Wait for the scan and disinfection process to be over. Then click Continue. Please reboot your computer after the disinfection is over.



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